My Travel in Vancouver 2 (Day 1 Part 2) ~Museum of Anthropology~: The person that walks about finds a cafe.

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4 22 6      Vancouver is the coffee junkies’ paradise. You don’t need to look for a café. The person that walks about finds a café. Before going back to the hotel, I decided to have a coffee break. I had decided to try Tim Hortons and Blenz coffee because both of them are Canadian shops, and I found one of Tim Hortons at Alberni Street soon after leaving the bank. I bought a cup of coffee and a blueberry muffin there. I thought the coffee was a little weak, but it was nice, and the muffin was tasty. バンクーバー2014 021

     After checking in the hotel, I decided to go to Museum of Anthropology in the University of British Columbia, which was the place I had most wanted to visit. I like First Nations’ relics and artworks. バンクーバー2014 022

     I needed to take a bus to go there from downtown. Inconveniently, you have to pay the exact coin fare when you take a bus in Vancouver. You know, I gave up having the electric fare card. But I managed to gather $2.75 which was the one-way fare because I had paid in cash at Tim Hortons. So, I decided to use the coins for the return trip and to buy a ticket at Burrard Station for going to the museum. バンクーバー2014 024

     I got on the bus for the university near the station. It was about a 30-minute ride. I got off the bus at West Bound Chancellor Boulevard at Allison Road and started walking to the museum. The skies were blue and the breeze was cool. I saw the blue sea just ahead on the right. I felt fantastic. After a 15-minute walk, I was welcomed by a big sculpture standing by the museum. The entrance looked like a Japanese Shinto shrine gate called Torii. The admission fee was $6.75. バンクーバー2014 025

     There were many wooden beavers on the wall. Ancient people created not only beavers but also other wild animals in Canada, such as wolves, or grizzly bears. Each item was dynamic.

     Interestingly their gates looked like Japanese Torii. Cultures of Canadian aboriginal people might have something to do with faraway Japan. In fact, the appearance of some tribial people  there looks Japanese… バンクーバー2014 037

     Both of us might have connected in the same cultural area in ancient times. In fact, I found another similar item at the museum: wooden fish. They are used as percussion instrument for Buddhist ceremonies in Japan. Interesting!バンクーバー2014 032

     The museum also has outdoor exhibits: Haida tribe houses and totem poles. I strolled around the museum, imagining ancient civilizations. バンクーバー2014 047

     It was nearly 5 p.m. but the sun was still high because the sunset was after 8 o’clock. I was feeling freedom released from daily life.バンクーバー2014 052

My Travel in Vancouver 1 (Day 1 Part 1) is here.

 

Japanese Version is here.

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