The Lunch Time Concert

Standard

view_036      
     What a graceful day it was! I went to a classical music concert and then had lunch at an Italian restaurant with some of my friends last Sunday.

     Last week a friend of mine emailed me, “Why don’t you go to a concert with me? I have two tickets.” It said that our friends’ daughter was going to play there. I replied her immediately, “Yes, I’d love to go!”  view_069

     The concert was held at Munetsugu Hall in Sakae. It was the first time for me to go there. The concert hall just opened in 2007. This time what I listened to was entitled “Cello-to-sugosu-nichiyobi”, or a Sunday when you spend time with cellos. As the title shows, the concert was performed by four cellists belonging to Chubu Philharmonic Orchestra.

     There were four parts in the concert and interestingly a cello was added at each part. I mean it was solo at the first part (Prelude-Fantasia from Suite for Cello Solo by G. Cassado), duet at the second part (8 pieces from 18 Duos by B. Bartok), trio at the third part (Requiem op.66 by D. Popper), and then quartet at the last part (Chaconne from Partita 02 BWV 1004 for solo violin part 2 from J.S. Bach). I think cello quartet is out of common. content_cms_378_ph1_20090106125028

     The concert was held at so-called lunch time. Munetsugu Hall has the lunch time concert almost every day. The owner of the concert hall started it in order to have people enjoy classical music with a light heart. So the lunch time concert costs just 1000 yen.

     Actually Mr. Tokuji Munetsugu, the owner, is the founder of a restaurant chain named Curry House CoCo ICHIBANYA, which is well-known here as established in Nagoya. He retired from the company and then started a kind of philanthropic work, one of which is opening Munetsugu Hall, in 2002. Anyway I think it’s wonderful to familiarize ourselves with classical music in our daily lives.untitled

     After the concert I had lunch with some of my friends who I met at the hall at an Italian restaurant named Il Nodo. Nodo means knot in English, but a waitress explained that the knot means people bond when I asked. The lunch was wonderful. Classical music, delicious lunch, and chatting with friends…I had a great time!HI352156

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s